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Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
it could be a big day for our whole entire country. >> and the news is whether we've got a deal or not. shortly after ten o'clock last night. harry reid said you know, i was going to have everybody show up in the mid feel the night and take a vote at 1 a.m. and he received word from the white house that apparently, the white house and this really hacks him off, you know, because it kind of bypasses him, and former speaker pelosi, dealing directly with mitch mcconnell, joe biden 6789 it sounds like they've got a deal, and close to a deal and some of of the frame work as well to talk about it. >> yeah, it looks like it's been going back and forth and take a look, it looks like debt ceiling increase, 1.2 trillion to 2.4 last night last through the night and living in my office, as high as 2.8 trillion dollars in debt ceiling increases, spending cuts have to be about the same amount commensurate. >> dollar for dollar. >> at least if not more. >> and guys, there's a little bit of wrangling whether or not that balanced budget amendment that john boehner needed so badly to get the house to vo
. even american banks have almost $300 billion. is italy too big to fail? >> well, certainly it is. i mean, if you have to think about a rescue package for italy no one today has the money to put it up. i mean, let's face it, as you said before, italy is six times the size of greece. so i think that everybody should be quite calm. today the markets were doing much better. it's true, as ken was saying before, part of the confusion arose because of a fight over an internal political fight between berlusconi and finance minister tremonte. but the decree for a large austerity plan was already passed. and it was because of this fight that the markets feared that maybe this decree was not going to be approved by parliament. today the situation has been clarified. by friday this package will be passed and, you know, italy is going to go on by adopting this plan and by 2014 it will have a balanced budget which is going to be quite an enviable situation if all of this will go according to plan. >> suarez: professor rogoff, the news of the austerity plan seemed to have calmed really jittery mar
is your chance to talk back on one of the big stories of the day. today's question is what would you tell congress to do about the debt limit? carol costello is joining us from washington. carol, i bet you're going to get a lot of folks weighing in on this one. >> i urge all of our facebook friends to keep it clean. that's my only request today. what is happening in washington is political gamesmanship at its worse. it's ugly and more than a little scary. the united states has never gone into default because past administrations and lawmakers have compromised. cnn contributor john avalon says lawmakers have raised the debt ceiling 77 times including 8 tooils times under ronald reagan and back in the day politicians weren't quite so macho. many insist on standing on principal even though most americans stand on the side of good old fashioned compromise. two-thirds of americans want the president and republicans to compromise, rather than stand up for their beliefs to get things done. wow. a break from part is anship. perhaps the happiest outcome of the president's speech last night was whe
is the big bad government is a threat to us. the consumer protection bureau as most americans understand is the government protecting them from abuse by private financial institutions. and they are terrified that the public will see that there is value to a public institution that can prevent them from being abused by private institutions because it undercuts the whole rationale that the government is always bad, always a problem. and that's why we are fighting so hard for it. >> congressman barney frank, democrat of massachusetts, ranking democrat on the financial committee. thank you for your time tonight. >>> texas governor, and gonna run for president guy, rick perry made a very surprising decision today that is going to upset some of his most ardent supporters. i'll tell you about it with a smile when i come back. >>> there are two things happening in rick perry's political life that are on a collision course. the first thing is that he plainly is going to run for president. he is leaking to the press that his wife wants him to run, she is actively encourage ing him to do it. he jus
's going to happen in denver. remind them of the big thompson flood or any time we have blizzards. people in florida during the hurricanes. despite the effort of florida power britney and crews from all over the country to turn the power back on, people and fun were still without power for six weeks. that's not bad today. think about august, september, in d.c. your apartment, your home, your condo, your office, or ever is, no power for six weeks. i don't want to be around you guys. you'll be nuts. you'll be irritable, pain in the rear, some of you might go off the deep end, start shooting or whenever. there is a very thin line between this technologically savvy society that we have today and mother nature or man either purposely or accidentally creating a crisis where everything we take for granted is gone. i'm afraid that most of us are deadly indifferent to it. we don't like to think about it. my time in d.c. and fema has made me a pervert in respect because now when i travel i think about how i get back, something happens. at think about we were in wholefoods are someplace. i'm looking
. it's kind of incredible. i think it's been easy to lose sense of the big picture here, but the further you get away from what just happened, the bigger perspective you take on it, the more incredible it is. 70 times to raise the debt ceiling. raising the debt ceiling is something that happens as a matter of course. it's a run of the mill no headline kind of event. >> this is really housekeeping, tim. this has nothing to say, nothing to do with future spending. this simply reflects decisions made in the past and it ought to be treated like the housekeeping matter it is. >> george w. bush's budget director, mitch daniels, explaining the bush administration hoped raising the debt ceiling would be handled by congress as a housekeeping matter. that's how it was handled over the last decade. in the george w. bush administration, congress raised the ceiling seven separate times. among the republicans raising their current tantrums among john boehnor, eric canton, mitch mcconnell, jon kyl, collectively they passed 19 votes during the bush administration to raise the debt ceili
in transforming themselves, she's one of the big reasons why. please help me in welcoming to the stage, liz schuller. [applause] >> thank you. all right. thank you, barry, for the introduction. and i'd like to think raj for raising the bar. thanks a lot for the rest of us and not those creative messaging tools that we all need to address inequality. i wish i would have heard her before my speech. so why am i here as part of this panel? the whole point of what i want to talk to you today is the power of collective action and how it could counter the rise in inequality and how unions fit into that picture. now, when i think about inequality, especially, as of late, i think about those teachers in wisconsin, construction workers in ohio, nurses in new hampshire, who have been locked out and denied their basic rights to collective bargaining. we've seen what it looks like the state capital in wisconsin and we show you now what's happening in office buildings all across this country. ♪ >> here's to america's workers. when the economy was down, they sacrificed. during tough times when executive
cuts. in a big deal, lawmakers may find them worthwhile. state republican leader mitch mcconnell says they all want a deal but they fear a big tax increase. >> bret: the director of the capital of economic advisors will join us in a moment. federal appeals court barred any enforcement on the ban on openly gay service members. the ninth circuit court of appeals in san francisco says the "don't ask, don't tell" policy must be lifted immediately. they repealed it in september but the pentagon is working on the transition. we learned today that the shooter in the fort hood massacre will face death penalty in his court-martial. army sigh control psychiatrist nidal hasan faces charges in the shooting spree at the texas army post. authorities are warning airlines that terrorists may try to con seem explosives within their bodies. we have more on the story we told you about tuesday, about a terror suspect being brought to the u.s. to face criminal charges. national correspondent catherine herridge has defails. >> reporter: this court in southern district of new york is where somali national t
think forward to september 11, 2001, all of you know where you were. we were in big sky, montana, preparing a presentation to the national emergency manager. i was the general council at the time, despite from "time" magazine or other things, i came in and worked my way up the ladder at fema. and we got to c130 and flew back here. won't andrews. the next day went over. either that day or the next day win went to the pentagon. it was shortly after having walked in with the search and rescue teams. they have the dogs, if you are a dog lover, meet them. they are wonderful. aren't they? we walked in through the hole in the pentagon and came back out. i forget who it was. somebody was there to greet me to let me know. they wanted to make sure i didn't know about it. a good friend of ours had been on there. we had been with her a week o so before the attacks. all of this is real to me. most of us will go through life and we don't have the personal experience of losing relatives and friends. most of us won't go through life, unless having served, being exposed to the kind of death and d
that submerged that's been debated about too big to fail, there's no point they did. in fact, when the republicans have the hearings on the international competition, two industry witnesses, one representing the bank, orientation, and one house from harvard who's been the supporter of a strong event and industry and skeptical of some regulations and committee both noted that there was a potential competitive disadvantage for large american financial institutions because we are so firm in not allowing bailouts. they noted that america has by far the strongest anti-public participation in bailout law and rules in the world and that this could be a problem for american institutions and others. the argument, bit way, that being designated as a systemically important financial institution is an advantage because you will be able to borrow more cheaply. this is -- we've heard of the gift that keeps on giving -- this is the gift that people keep on refusing. unanimously, any institution there that's discretion about to whether or not it was designated as systemically important has vehemen
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)